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ABHINAV SUNDAR

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Hossein Kassiri
Award: Mitacs

Bio:
Abhinav Sundar is a 4th year undergraduate student at Birla Institute of Technology and Science Pilani, Pilani campus, India. He is double majoring in Physics and Electrical Engineering. Under the MITACS Globalink Research Internship program, he will be conducting research work at the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department of York University, under the supervision of Prof. Hossein Kassiri. As a new member of the Integrated Circuits and Systems Lab, he will be working on optogenetic stimulation, one of the group’s ongoing projects. More specifically, he will be printing a microlens to improve directivity of light used to stimulate nerve cells. The lens will be printed on a chip that has already been designed.
Over the summer, Abhinav will focus on optimizing the existing COMSOL model for the lens, and will later move on to fabricate it using the inkjet printer available in the Electronics Additive Manufacturing Lab.

ASHAR LATIF

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Peter Lian
Award: LURA

Bio:
Ashar Latif is a 4th year Electrical Engineering student at the Lassonde School of Engineering at York University. Ashar is spending the summer in Dr. Peter Lian’s lab developing a wearable system for the detection of heart arrhythmias. Specifically, he is designing a hardware front end for the acquisition, amplification, and filtering of ballistocardiogram (BCG) data, as well as implementing a mechanism to communicate the gathered data via Bluetooth LE to a machine learning algorithm for further processing. The finished device needs to be optimized to be sensitive enough to deal with the extremely low-amplitude signals while also maximizing battery life to minimize impediments to use by the end users. By the end of the summer, Ashar hopes to have designed and tested the PCB and become familiar with the hardware design and optimization process with the end goal of further developing non-invasive preventative medical devices.

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BRITTANY DANISHEVSKY

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: John Tsotsos
Award: NSERC USRA

Bio:
Brittany Danishevsky started at York University this past winter in the EECS department. She comes to York after graduating from the Psychology, Brain, and Cognition program at the University of Guelph. The switch from Psychology to Computer Science was motivated by Brittany’s first job at a tech start up; where she was exposed to the potential of technology and AI for positive social impact. Her background in Psychology comes in handy for predicting user behaviour, as well as for building machine learning algorithms which require an understanding of attention, vision, and perception. Brittany's interests meld nicely into her summer research project, where she is working under Dr. John Tsotsos in a computer vision and robotics lab. This summer, she is building software for an autonomous wheelchair with the goal of navigating a cluttered environment using computer vision. This technology can be implemented in nursing homes to relieve some of the burden on nurses and support workers.

CHESTER WYKE

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Ruth Urner
Award: LURA

Bio:
Chester Wyke is a 2nd year Computer Science student at York University. He has several years experience working at a financial institution and will be spending the summer exploring interpretable machine learning in Dr. Ruth Urner’s laboratory. Specifically, Chester will be implementing a framework for semi-supervised interpretable learning with neural networks. This is important because machine learning is a rapidly growing field and is being employed in increasingly critical applications, such as those that significantly affect an individual either legally or financially. A better understanding how these decisions are reached, greatly influences user trust and acceptance.

FASIL CHEEMA

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Peter Lian
Award: NSERC USRA

Bio:
Fasil Cheema is a 3rd year student double majoring in Math and Physics. Fasil will be spending the summer trying to develop machine learning algorithms to extract heart variation information from bio signals obtained by wireless wearable ballistocardiograph (BCG) sensors. The data obtained from the devices are very sensitive and are prone to being very noisy, with the help of machine learning algorithms the aim is to help preserve as much relevant information hidden in the data as possible. By the end of the summer Fasil is hoping to have developed a machine learning algorithm capable of such a task. This project is important because it will shed light on people’s heart condition using accessible BCG devices. Knowing the heart condition will be a great help for patients with cardiovascular diseases, especially for heart failure (HF) patients. With HF being a significant health issue affecting hundreds of thousands of Canadians and their families.

HAIDER AL-TAHAN

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Richard P. Wildes
Award: NSERC USRA

Bio:
Haider Al-Tahan is a 4th year student majoring Computer Science and Psychology at York University. Haider strive to develop a multidisciplinary skill set by projecting understanding of biological and physiological components of human perception onto computational approaches to solving problems in visual and auditory perception. Haider will be working this summer with Professor Richard Wildes on building the world’s largest dynamic scene’s database. A key component of making advances in machine learning is the development of large scale, carefully curated databases for training and testing. By the end of the summer, Haider is hoping that this project would help contribute to the computer vision community as this database will be made available to other researchers throughout the field and continue his development as a researcher in machine learning and computational perception.

JIA YING OU

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Amirhossein Chinaei
Award: LURA

Bio:
Jia Ying Ou recently completed her bachelor degree in computer security at York University. During the past semester, she was actively involved in a research project on enhancing WordPress system from role-based access control to attribute-based access control. Jia Ying is hoping to further the research by exploring machine learning on real-time access control under Dr. Chinaei’s supervision this summer. Her research will be applying machine learning techniques on access control data to learn patterns of users accessing data to automatically learn access control rules. This is important because as artificial intelligence methods continue to improve, the opportunities of their applications on different industries. There is a demand for intelligent systems for online and real-time access control. By the end of the summer, Jia Ying aims to familiarize herself with deep neural networks, convolutional neural networks, sequence models and being able to structure machine learning projects.

KEN TJHIA

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Manos Papagelis
Award: NSERC USRA

Bio:
Ken just completed his third year at York University majoring in Computer Science and minoring in Mathematics, with a special interest in data mining and machine learning. Ken is spending the summer working with Professor Papagelis on the problem of temporal network representation learning. Specifically, Ken will spend some time acquiring the necessary background knowledge before reading the latest papers and experimenting with their methods. Once caught up, Ken will explore new methods for learning representations of dynamic (temporal) networks, then experimentally evaluate these methods on synthetic and real network datasets.

KEVIN JOSEPH

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Hui Jiang
Award: NSERC USRA

Bio:
Kevin Joseph is a 4th year Statistics Major, Computer Science Minor at York University. Kevin is working with Professor Hui Jiang in the iFLYTEK Laboratory. Kevin is working in the multi-modal domain of scene understanding. His project involves a semi-supervised approach to create a unique type of scene graph to be used for image retrieval as well as image captioning.

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MAEVE WILDES

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Franck van Breugel
Award: NSERC USRA

Bio:
Maeve Wildes is entering her fourth year studying Mathematics and Computer Science at McGill University. Maeve is spending the summer researching probabilistic model checking in Dr. Franck van Breugel’s laboratory. Along with Zainab and Yash, Maeve will be collecting probabilistic models as well as implementing randomized algorithms in order to develop a large suite of realistic models. These models will be analyzed to identify similar characteristics, find realistic parameters, and discover properties that may be unexpected or of note. By the end of the summer, Maeve is hoping to have furthered the research by highlighting existing models and developing more, and using these to identify useful and interesting properties. This is important because it will provide the research community with benchmarks which are currently lacking as well as providing techniques to develop realistic models.

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MAHMOUD ALSAEED

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Manos Papagelis
Award: LURA

Bio:
Mahmoud Alsaeed is a senior undergraduate student of Computer Science at the Lassonde School of Engineering. He is currently working as a research assistant in the Data Mining Lab, under the supervision of Dr. Manos Papagelis. His research project entails the use of computational geometry algorithms for fast mining and analysis of overlapping geometric shapes. In particular, the focus
is on improving the efficiency of computing the Intersection over Union (IoU) evaluation metric. IoU is a statistic used for determining the similarity and diversity of sample sets and it is commonly employed to evaluate the accuracy of a machine learning model against the ground truth (e.g., in the problem of object
detection in images). In this project, we aim to design and develop efficient and principled methods for simultaneously comparing the performance of multiple models against the ground truth. The premise of the project is to support decision making in finding/tuning the hyper-parameters .

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MIRA KVICH

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Matthew Perras
Award: RAY

Bio:
Mira Kvich is currently pursuing her degree in software engineering. She has experience in Arduino systems, and is focusing on applying this experience in her work for Dr. Perras, where she will optimise real world data transfer for sensor data. Mira will be working with Libelium hardware systems, testing and coding to improve response time and better understand the ifluence of temperature. By the end of the summer, Mira is hoping to achieve seamless data transfer as per the specifications and requirements of Dr Perras. Mira believes this project is important because quick and accurate data transfer is extremely important in the field of civil engineering, and applying the experience and knowledge of software systems is the only way to achieve this.

MOHAMMADREZA KARIMI

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Hossein Kassiri
Award: NSERC USRA

Bio:
My name is Reza Karimi and I just finished my second year in computer science. This summer, I’m working with Dr. Hossein Kassiri on seizure detection using brain EEG signals. Specifically, I will use machine learning algorithms to create models that detect seizures. By the end of the summer, I hope to have a better understanding of signal processing and optimize the current model in terms of its accuracy and performance. Many people have worked in this specific field, but yet, there’s no commercial product because of the many challenges that this type of device can face. For example, there’s the issue of limited computational power on small chips. So other than the accuracy of the model, I have to consider the product that it’s going to be used on and have the efficiency of my model in mind too. I’m hoping to contribute to this project by solving the challenges on my side of work.

OLGA KLUSHINA

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Peter Lian
Award: LURA

Bio:
Olga Klushina is a 3rd year student at Lassonde School of Engineering at York University. Having specialized in Electrical Engineering, Olga is spending the summer exploring Ballistocardio signal of the heart in Dr. Lian’s laboratory. Specifically, Olga will be developing hardware in diagnosing abnormalities of the heart which can save lives by early detection and prevention. Most importantly, this technique is non invasive and can monitor the heart using a small device from the surface of the body.

ORI WIEGNER

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Suprakash Datta
Award: LURA

Bio:
Ori Wiegner is a 2nd year computer science student at the Lassonde School of Engineering. Ori has a prior background in medical radiation sciences specializing in radiation therapy, which he will put to use in his research. Throughout this summer Ori will be exploring the topics of medical imaging and machine learning with Dr. Suprakash Datta. During his studies, Ori has gained interest in many fields of computer science especially in machine learning and will combine this with his prior experience of working with medical images. By the end of the summer, Ori is hoping to develop a system that can analyze and diagnose medical images. This project is important because it will integrate technology with the current health care system to provide reliable and efficient diagnosis from medical images.

RICHARD ROBINSON

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Robert Allison
Award: LURA

Bio:
Richard Robinson is a 2nd year student at the Lassonde School of Engineering, specializing in Software Engineering. Being extremely passionate about learning new technologies, Richard is researching the affects of Virtual Reality on visual perception, under the supervision of Professor Rob Allison with the Centre for Vision Research. Richard will be creating and experimenting with creating virtual environments with technologies such as Unity. Richard is also doing small projects involving perception at the AMPD IceCube project. By the end of the summer, Richard is hoping to have furthered the research of VR and enhanced his knowledge.

RYAN KARABA

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Ebrahim Ghafar-Zadeh
Award: LURA

Bio:
Ryan Karaba is an Electrical Engineering student studying in his final year at York University. Having great experience with signal processing, Ryan is exploring non-invasive Micro Electrode Arrays with Professor Ebrahim Ghafar-Zadeh. Specifically, Ryan will be recording and analyzing electrophysiological signals from Larval Zebrafish for examining mature development alongside drug effects. This is very important, as Zebrafish studies are rapidly expanding due to their advantageous and efficient model. Furthermore, Ryan will be working on improving the design of the Micro Electrode Arrays to enhance the viability of signals being recorded and additionally he will work on establishing new ways of using the MEA via microfluidic structures. By the end of summer, Ryan is hoping to have discovered unique electrophysiological responses of zebrafish to various drugs while ultimately wanting to expand the future of Multi Electrode Arrays for the neuroscience community.

SAMY ELIAS

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Afshin Rezaei-Zare
Award: LURA

Bio:
Samy Elias is a 3rd year student at Lassonde School of Engineering at York University. Having specialized in Electrical Engineering, Sam is spending the summer exploring the dynamic force on distribution generation connection (DG)connection, in high-voltage substations. Using Matlab, and of course, mathematical models which represent the physics of the problem, Sam will be implementing Dr. Rezaei's approach in solving for the force which the DG connections experience during a short circuit fault. By the end of the summer, Sam is hoping to represent a complete code, which will calculate that force, for the expected given parameters. That force is an important parameter in the construction and operation of the substations.

SYYEDA ZAINAB FATMI

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Franck van Breugel
Award: NSERC USRA

Bio:
Syyeda Zainab Fatmi has graduated from the Computer Engineering program at Lassonde School of Engineering. Zainab is passionate about programming and chose to spend the summer researching Probabilistic Model Checking in the DisCoVeri Lab under the guidance of Professor Franck van Breugel. Over the course of the summer, Zainab is working with Maeve and Yash to obtain a large collection of realistic instances of probabilistic models, by gathering sample models and implementing randomized algorithms in Java and then extracting models from the Java code. They will then assess the impact of parameters on the properties of a model, as well as identify the common characteristics of the collection of realistic models. This research will benefit the research community by providing much-needed benchmarks for evaluating probabilistic model checkers and by providing insight on how to choose meaningful parameters for randomized algorithms.

THERESA NGUYEN

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: John Lam
Award: LURA

Bio:
Theresa Nguyen is in her final year of her B.Eng and B.A. in Mechanical Engineering and International Development at the Lassonde School of Engineering, York University. She will be conducting research on the development of a thermal analytical model for an electrolytic capacitor-less photo voltaic micro-converter in the PELSER lab under the supervision of Dr. John Lam. In the wake of global warming, alternative sources of energy are looked at favourably. Photovoltaic energy has the highest growth rate in its global capacity, but its lifespan is limited by the micro-converter. By conducting thermal simulations of a new electrolytic capacitor-less micro-converter, the performance of photo voltaic cells can be analyzed in order to better its efficiency. The hope is to use this research to increase the lifespan of photo voltaic cells, increasing the use of clean renewable energy resources for a more sustainable future.

WES EARDLEY

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Gene Cheung
Award: LURA

Bio:
Wes Eardley has completed his undergraduate degree in Statistics from York University. In the fall, Wes will be attending the University of Toronto’s Master of Mathematical Finance program. This summer Wes is working in Dr. Gene Cheung’s lab where the research will focus on Matrix Completion. Given some sort of signal on a graph with missing data, the task at hand is to recover the unknown parts of the graph with as much precision as possible. Assuming some prior knowledge of the signal, Wes plans to employ a Bayesian approach to recover the missing data. In this approach he will use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling procedure to generate a random process that has the same limiting distribution as the signal under consideration. In turn giving rise to a suitable method for reconstructing the graph.

YASH DHAMIJA

Dept. Of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Supervisor: Franck Breugel
Award: LURA

Bio:
Yash Dhamija is a 3rd year student at the Lassonde School of Engineering ,York University. Having specialized in Computer Science, Yash is spending the summer exploring the software benchmarking tools in Dr. Franck’s laboratory. Specifically, Yash will be developing probabilistic models that simulates the real-world examples using randomized algorithms. By the end of the summer, Yash is hoping to accumulate the largest dataset for the such model checking tools and analyze these models for the important relations that they exhibit. This is important because testing the software based on real-case scenarios, could improve the quality of programs, and also could be of help to the research community.